Q & AAutomotive batteries are an example of which hazard class?

Automotive batteries are an example of which hazard class?

Question: Automotive batteries are an example of which hazard class?

A) Class 1: Explosives
B) Class 2: Gases
C) Class 3: Flammable liquids
D) Class 8: Corrosive substances
Answer: D) Class 8: Corrosive substances
Explanation: Automotive batteries contain sulfuric acid, which is a highly corrosive substance. Corrosive substances are classified as Class 8 hazardous materials according to the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals.
Class 1 is for explosives, which includes items such as fireworks, ammunition, and blasting agents. Class 2 is for gases, which include compressed gases, liquefied gases, and dissolved gases. Class 3 is for flammable liquids, which include substances such as gasoline, diesel fuel, and alcohol. These substances have a flashpoint below 60°C.
Class 8, as mentioned, is for corrosive substances, which are defined as substances that can cause visible destruction or irreversible alterations to living tissue or other materials. These substances have a pH less than or equal to 2 or greater than or equal to 12.5.
Therefore, option D, Class 8: Corrosive substances, is the correct answer to this question. Automotive batteries are an example of Class 8 hazardous material because they contain sulfuric acid, which is highly corrosive and can cause significant damage to living tissue and other materials.

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